Monday, August 31, 2015

Ned Lamont urges Blumenthal to support Iran deal


Former Senate candidate Ned Lamont has called for Sen. Richard Blumenthal to vote in favor of the multi-national, nuclear non-proliferation agreement that’s been struck with the government of Iran. All the other members of Connecticut's Washington delegation have voiced support of the deal.

Lamont posted advertisements online urging Sen. Blumenthal, the one holdout, to pledge his support of the agreement. This is obviously a difficult issue for the senator, and according to a story in CT News Junkie, "...the state’s senior senator wouldn’t say whether his Jewish heritage would play a part in his own decision to support or oppose the deal."

Not surprisingly, neo-con chickenhawk Joe Lieberman is actively campaigning against the deal. Lieberman has proven himself to be one of the biggest obstacles to a lasting peace in the region, and it doesn't take a political genius to figure out where AIPAC-Joe gets his bread buttered!

Lieberman is taking over as the head of an advocacy group, United Against Nuclear Iran (UANI), trying to kill the nuclear deal with Iran after a former executive decided to embrace the agreement. Former group president Gary Samore — the White House’s former top arms control adviser — is being replaced since he does not want to have the agreement blocked. It says something when the head of an organization devoted to killing the deal changes his mind after reading and reflecting on the agreement. It cost him the job, but obviously it was that important to him.

Congress is expected to vote on the resolution by September 17th.

Sunday, August 23, 2015

2016 Primary Calendar

Here we go again!

This list of primaries is reposted in its entirety from Frontloading HQ, please go there for current updates because they're doing the actual work! Although, the graphical image below can definitely use a little jazzing up...

Also, I'm still STRONGLY in favor of establishing regional primaries, to allow the candidates to visit states in a small area and getting more voters to actually SEE and HEAR the candidates. Divide the nation into four quarters, and have primaries run in February through May over four weeks in each month. Rotate the months so if the Northeast gets February, the next year they go on in May, and each year rotate closer to the top. Within each region the states can work out what weeks they get, and set up a rotation within their region.

It's totally fair to everyone, which means it will be opposed by pretty much every state!


2016 Presidential Primary Calendar

January
Monday, January 18:
Iowa caucuses1 (***tentative placement given current incomplete information***)

[NOTE: Both the Democratic and Republican parties in Iowa are currently planning on February 1 caucuses at this time, but are likely to move if other states keep, settle on or move into February positions on the calendar (see Colorado).]

Tuesday, January 26:
New Hampshire (***tentative placement given current incomplete information***)

February
Tuesday, February 2:
Colorado caucuses2
(2015 Legislation: March primary -- Died in Committee)

Saturday, February 20:
Nevada Democratic caucuses (***tentative placement given current incomplete information***)

[NOTE: Nevada Democrats are planning on February 20 caucuses. Republicans in the Silver state will make firmer their plans for 2016 during an August 29 state central committee meeting. (see also Colorado).]

South Carolina Republican primary (***tentative placement given current incomplete information***)

[NOTE: The South Carolina Republican primary is subject to change depending on the resolution of the North Carolina presidential primary scheduling.]


Tuesday, February 23:
North Carolina3 (***tentative placement given current incomplete information***)
(2015 Legislation: March 8 primary; March 15 primary)

Saturday, February 27:
South Carolina Democratic primary (***tentative placement given current incomplete information***)

[NOTE: South Carolina Democrats are planning to hold a February 27 presidential primary. It is unclear whether the North Carolina primary situation will impact this scheduling.]


March
Tuesday, March 1:
Alabama
(2015 Legislation: March 1 primary -- Became Law -- became law 5/28/15 without
gubernatorial signature)
[+7]
Arkansas
(2015 Legislation: separate March presidential primary; consolidated March primary -- both
Died at end of session)
(2015 Special Session Legislation: earlier May primary -- Died in Committee; March 1 primary:
House -- House version Died in Senate Committee]/Senate -- [Senate version Signed into Law
-- signed 5/29/15])
[+84]
Colorado Democratic caucuses2
(2015 Legislation: March primary -- Died in Committee)
(tentatively set on May 4, 2015 based on draft delegate selection plan)
Massachusetts
(2013 Legislation: consolidated June primary -- Died at end of session)
(2015 Legislation: consolidated June primary)
Minnesota caucuses
(Caucuses date set on 2/14/15)
(2015 Legislation: last Tuesday in March primary: House/Senate)
[-28]4
Oklahoma
(2015 Legislation: move primary to fourth Tuesday in March)
Tennessee
Texas
(2013 Legislation: Saturday primary, February primary -- all Died in Committee)
(2015 Legislation: January primary -- Died in Committee)
Vermont
(2015 Legislation: Primary same date as New Hampshire primary: Senate/House -- Dead for 2015
but carries over to 2016 session)
Virginia

Saturday, March 5:
Louisiana
(2014 legislation: earlier March primary -- Signed into Law -- signed 6/19/14)
[+14]
Kentucky Republican caucuses
(2015 action: date set on August 22, 2015 following central committee vote)
[+73]
Kansas Democratic caucuses
(tentatively set on May 2, 2015 based on draft delegate selection plan)
Kansas Republican caucuses
(tentatively set on January 31, 2015 at state convention)
Nebraska Democratic caucuses
(tentatively set on March 31, 2015 based on draft delegate selection plan)

Sunday, March 6:
Maine Democratic caucuses
(tentatively set on March 31, 2015 based on draft delegate selection plan)


Tuesday, March 8:
Hawaii Republican caucuses
Idaho (Republicans only)
(2015 Legislation: second Tuesday in March primary (I) -- Died at end of session, second
Tuesday in March primary (II) -- Signed into Law -- signed 4/9/15, 2016 presidential
primary funding -- Signed into Law -- signed 4/10/15)
[-7]
Michigan
(2014 Legislation: March primary -- Died at end of session)
(2015 Legislation: March primary -- Signed into Law -- signed 2/20/15)
[-14]
Mississippi
(2015 Legislation: March 1 primary: House/Senate -- Senate bill died in Conference)


Sunday, March 13:
Puerto Rico (Republicans)

Tuesday, March 15:
Florida
(2013 Legislation: March primary -- Died in Committee; Primary on first unpenalized date --
Signed into Law -- 5/21/13)
(2015 Legislation: March 15 primary -- House/Senate -- House version signed into Law -- signed
3/19/15)
[-49]5
Illinois
(2013 Legislation: June primary -- Died in Committee)
(2015 Legislation: June primary, July primary)
Missouri
(2013 Legislation: March primary: House/Senate, April primary -- all Died in Committee)
(2014 Legislation: March primary: House/Senate -- Senate committee substitute Signed into
Law -- signed 6/4/14)
[-42]
Ohio
(2015 Legislation: March 15 primary -- Signed into Law -- signed 6/10/15)
[-7]

Tuesday, March 22:
Idaho Democratic caucuses
(tentatively set on March 30, 2015 based on draft delegate selection plan)
Arizona
(2013 Legislation: Fix primary date to date of Iowa caucuses -- Died at end of session)
(2014 Legislation: move the primary to the Tuesday after March 15 -- Signed into Law --
signed 4/16/14)
(2015 Legislation: Fix primary date to date of Iowa caucuses -- Died at end of session)
[-28]
Utah Democratic caucuses
(tentatively set on April 30, 2015 based on draft delegate selection plan)
Utah Republican caucuses (online voting begins March 15)
(set at State Central Committee meeting -- 5/30/15)
(2015 Changes: Utah Republican Party votes to switch to caucuses. -- 3/7/15)

Saturday, March 26:
Alaska Democratic caucuses
(tentatively set on March 17, 2015 based on draft delegate selection plan)
Hawaii Democratic caucuses
(tentatively set on April 3, 2015 based on draft delegate selection plan)
Washington Democratic caucuses
(tentatively set on March 16, 2015 based on draft delegate selection plan)

April
Tuesday, April 5:
Wisconsin6
(2015 Legislation: February primary)

Saturday, April 9:
Wyoming Democratic caucuses
(tentatively set on March 23, 2015 based on draft delegate selection plan)

Tuesday, April 19:
New York
(2015 Legislation: April 19 primary, April 26 primary -- April 19 bill signed into Law -- signed
7/23/15)
[-77]7

Tuesday, April 26:
Connecticut
(2015 Legislation: Thursday Republican primary, March primary -- both Died at end of
session)
Delaware
Maryland
(2015 Legislation: later April primary -- Senate version signed into Law -- signed
5/12/15)
[-21]
Pennsylvania
(2015 Legislation: third Tuesday in March primary)
Rhode Island
(2015 Legislation: fourth Tuesday in March primary -- Died in committee at end of
session)

May
Tuesday, May 3:
Indiana

Tuesday, May 10:
Nebraska
West Virginia

Tuesday, May 17:
Kentucky (Democrats only)
Oregon
(2015 Legislation: separate presidential, other primaries)

Tuesday, May 24:
Washington8
(2015 Legislation: March primary: House/Senate; cancel 2016 primary -- all Died at end of
session); primary funding bill: signed into Law -- signed June 30, 2015)

June
Tuesday, June 7:
California
Montana
(2013 Legislation: May primary -- Died in Committee)
(2015 Legislation: August primary -- appears Dead in Committee)
New Jersey
New Mexico
(2015 Legislation: March primary -- Died in Committee)
North Dakota Democratic caucuses
(tentatively set on March 27, 2015 based on draft delegate selection plan)
South Dakota

Tuesday, June 14:
Washington, DC
(2013 Legislation: June primary) -- Signed into Law -- cleared congressional review 5/2/15)
[-70]

Tuesday, June 28:
Utah9
(2013 Legislation: Primary funding -- Signed into Law)
(2014 Legislation: Primary before Iowa/New Hampshire -- Died in state Senate)
(2015 Legislation: March primary -- Died at end of session)

--
Primary states with no specified date:
Georgia
Kansas10
(2015 Legislation: cancel 2016 presidential primary: House/Senate, omnibus elections package --
Signed into Law -- signed 6/8/15)
[Primary cancelled]
Maine
(2013 Legislation: establish primary -- Died in Committee)
Nevada
(2013 Legislation: January primary -- Died in Committee)
(2015 Legislation: January February primary: Assembly/Senate -- both
Died at end of session)
New Hampshire
North Carolina3
(2013 Legislation: Move primary to Tuesday after South Carolina primary if South Carolina
is before March 15 -- Signed into Law -- signed 8/12/13)
(2015 Legislation: March primary)
South Carolina
(2012 Legislation: codify first in the South status -- Died in Committee)
(2014 Legislation: Primary funding -- Signed into Law -- signed 6/6/14)


--
Caucuses states with no specified date (NOTE: Dates may be different across parties within one state):
Alaska Republican caucuses
Maine Republican caucuses
North Dakota Republican caucuses
Washington Republican caucuses
Wyoming Republican caucuses

--
1 This date does conflict with the Martin Luther King Day holiday in 2016. As John Deeth points out in the comments section that is an issue that was a source of some discontent among Iowa Democrats when the caucuses and holiday overlapped in 2004. If that is an issue again in 2016, it may affect the date of the caucuses above. Moving it up further would perhaps push the envelope a bit too much, but the state parties may opt to hold the caucuses on a Tuesday -- a week before New Hampshire on January 19 -- as they did in 2012.
2 The state parties in Colorado have the option of choosing either the first Tuesday in March date called for in the statute or moving up to the first Tuesday in February.
3 The North Carolina primary is now scheduled for the Tuesday following the South Carolina primary if the South Carolina contest is prior to March 15. Given the protected status South Carolina enjoys with the national parties, a primary prior to March 15 is a certainty for both parties in the Palmetto state. The link to the North Carolina statute does not yet reflect the change made to the presidential primary law. Language laying out the parameters for the primary can be found in the bill (HB 589) signed into law in summer 2013.
4 The Minnesota state parties must agree on a date on which to hold caucuses by March 1 in the year prior to a presidential election. If no agreement is reached, the caucuses are set for the first Tuesday in February. So, while Minnesota technically had no date until February 14, 2015, and thus no real movement on the calendar, FHQ will include the fact that the Minnesota caucuses date moved back 28 days relative to their position in 2012.
5 The 2011 law granted the primary date setting authority in Florida to a committee for the 2012 cycle. That basically allowed Florida to reset to no date after the presidential primary until the Presidential Preference Primary Date Selection Committee met to set the date for the next subsequent cycle. That law was amended in 2013, eliminating the PPPDSC and setting the date of the Florida presidential primary for the earliest date not penalized by the delegate selection rules of the national parties. That law, too, kept the date of the 2016 primary in doubt. The Republican National Committee has rules penalizing both the timing of a primary and the delegate allocation based on the results of said primary. That, in turn, essentially ceded the decision on the date of the presidential primary to the Republican Party of Florida. If the state party opted for a winner-take-all delegate allocation, then the primary would be on March 15. However, opting into a proportional allocation plan would place the primary on March 1. The Republican Party of Florida had signaled, but not officially set/changed the allocation rules for 2016. As such (because of the PPPDSC reset and the 2013 law not being fully realized before it too was changed), Florida did not technically move any on the calendar (see Minnesota situation above). Yet, based on Florida's position on the last Tuesday in January in 2012, the 2016 primary will be seven weeks later.
6 See definition of "Spring election" for clause dealing with the timing of the presidential primary.
7 The New York primary was moved to April for the 2012 cycle by legislation passed in 2011. That legislation expired at the end of 2012 which brought the New York primary back to February.
8 The Washington presidential primary is scheduled for the fourth Tuesday in May by law. Current legislation would shift that date into March. However, neither state party in Washington has ever committed to using the primary election for the allocation of delegates to the national conventions long term. Washington, then, appears on the map as either March or May, but given the uncertainty over whether the parties will adopt the primary or use caucuses, FHQ also includes a gray "No Date" signifier.
9 The Western States Presidential Primary in Utah is scheduled for the first Tuesday in February, but the contest will only be held on that date if the state legislature decides to allocate funds for the primary. If (and only if) there is no Western States Presidential Primary (i.e.: the legislature does not fund the February contest) will the fourth Tuesday in June primary for other offices be an option available to the Utah parties according to the state law. However, the fourth Tuesday in June option is too late to comply with either national party's delegate selection rules for 2016. That would officially force the state parties to adopt a caucuses/convention process on a date of their choosing.
10 Kansas has not held a presidential primary since 1992. Funds have not been appropriated by the legislature for the primary since that time. That said, there are laws in place providing for a presidential preference primary. Assuming funding, the Kansas secretary of state has the option of choosing a date -- on or before November 1 in the year preceding the presidential election -- that either coincides with at least 5 other states' delegate selection events or is on the first Tuesday in April or before.

--
Update Chronology:
8/22/15 (Kentucky Republican caucuses added to the calendar following state central committee vote in favor of March 5 caucuses on Saturday, August 22, 2015.)
8/14/15 (Notes added for clarification of current carve-out state positioning on the calendar)
7/23/15 (New York presidential primary bill signed into law. Primary date moved from February 2 to April 19 on the calendar.)
7/20/15 (North Carolina March 15 primary bill added to the calendar.)
6/30/15 (Washington state primary locked in with funding included in 2015-17 budget. Other bills to reschedule or cancel the primary died at the conclusion of the third special session.)
6/29/15 (Rhode Island reshaded on the map after March primary bill died with the legislature's adjournment.)
6/24/15 (Kansas Republican caucus date added to the calendar and reshaded on the map. The date decision was made at the 2015 state convention on January 31.)
6/16/15 (New York presidential primary bill setting election for April 26 added to the calendar. New York is also reshaded on the map.)
6/10/15 (Pennsylvania bill to move presidential primary from April to the third Tuesday in March added to the calendar and reshaded on the map.)
6/10/15 (Ohio presidential primary moved to March 15 on the calendar after Governor Kasich signed HB 153.)
6/10/15 (Colorado Democratic caucuses added to the calendar and reshaded on the map based on the release of the state party's draft 2016 delegate selection plan.)
6/9/15 (Alabama SEC primary bill becomes law without gubernatorial signature, changing Alabama's position on the calendar.)
6/8/15 (Kansas bill canceling presidential primary signed into law changing Kansas on the calendar.)
6/4/15 (Both Connecticut presidential primary bills died at the close of 2015 legislative session. Connecticut is changed on the calendar and reshaded on map.)
6/3/15 (Utah Republican caucuses set after the Utah Republican Party State Central Committee meeting on May 30, 2015. Added to the calendar and reshaded on map.)
6/2/15 (Nevada and Texas primary bills died at conclusion of legislative sessions. Both were reshaded on map.)
5/29/15 (Arkansas primary date changed to March 1 (SEC primary date) on the calendar and reshaded on the map after Governor Hutchinson signed primary bill into law.)
5/26/15 (Arkansas special session presidential primary bills added to the calendar and reshaded on the map. One House bill would shift the consolidated primary up to the first Tuesday in May and create a study committee to examine the benefits of calendar positioning. Identical House and Senate versions of a consolidated primary scheduled for March 1 (SEC primary date) were also introduced.)
5/13/15 (Omnibus elections bill to cancel Kansas presidential primary added to the calendar.)
5/12/15 (Maryland presidential primary moved back on the calendar after Senate bill signed by Governor Hogan.)
5/8/15 (Kansas Democratic caucuses tentatively added to the calendar and reshaded on the map based on the release of the state party's draft 2016 delegate selection plan.)
5/6/15 (Utah Democratic caucuses tentatively added to the calendar and reshaded on the map based on the release of the state party's draft 2016 delegate selection plan.)
5/5/15 (The Colorado presidential primary bill died in committee. That change is reflected on the calendar the state was reshaded on map.)
5/4/15 (Washington, DC presidential primary moved on the calendar from the first Tuesday in April to the second Tuesday in June and reshaded on map.)
4/30/15 (Colorado presidential primary bill to reestablish a primary during the first half of March is added to the calendar and reshaded on map.)
4/29/15 (Puerto Rico presidential primary added to the calendar and reshaded on map.)
4/22/15 (Arkansas presidential primary legislation died in committee at the end of the 2015 regular session and reshaded on map.)
4/13/15 (Ohio legislation to move presidential primary back a week to March 15 added to the calendar.)
4/13/15 (Rhode Island bill to move the primary from the fourth Tuesday in April to the fourth Tuesday in March added to the calendar and reshaded on the map.)
4/13/15 (Nevada reshaded on the map to reflect amended legislation calling for various February presidential primary option.)
4/11/15 (Idaho March 8 primary date added to the calendar and reshaded on the map after the primary bill was signed into law.)
4/8/15 (Maine Democratic caucuses tentatively added to the calendar and reshaded on the map based on the release of the state party's draft 2016 delegate selection plan.)
4/7/15 (Idaho Democratic caucuses tentatively added to the calendar and reshaded on the map based on the release of the state party's draft 2016 delegate selection plan.)
4/7/15 (Alaska Democratic caucuses tentatively added to the calendar and reshaded on the map based on the release of the state party's draft 2016 delegate selection plan.)
4/6/15 (Hawaii Democratic caucuses tentatively added to the calendar and reshaded on the map based on the release of the state party's draft 2016 delegate selection plan.)
4/6/15 (Washington Democratic caucuses tentatively added to the calendar and reshaded on the map based on the release of the state party's draft 2016 delegate selection plan.)
4/5/15 (North Dakota Democratic caucuses tentatively added to the calendar and reshaded on the map based on the release of the state party's draft 2016 delegate selection plan.)
4/5/15 (Nebraska Democratic caucuses tentatively added to the calendar and reshaded on the map based on the release of the state party's draft 2016 delegate selection plan.)
4/4/15 (Arizona first in the nation presidential primary bill dies at the end of the 2015 state legislative session and is reshaded on the map.)
4/3/15 (Wyoming Democratic caucuses tentatively added to the calendar and reshaded on the map based on the release of the state party's draft 2016 delegate selection plan.)
4/1/15 (North Carolina March presidential primary bill added to the calendar and reshaded on the map)
3/30/15 (Mississippi SEC presidential primary bill died in conference, locking the state into a March 8 primary date.)
3/29/15 (Nevada state Senate bill to create a presidential primary added to the calendar.)
3/19/15 (Florida presidential primary is date set on the calendar.)
3/18/15 (Alabama SEC primary bill -- to move the primary to March 1 -- added to calendar)
3/14/15 (Nevada primary bill to create a presidential primary and consolidate it with other primaries on the Tuesday before the last Tuesday of January added to calendar and reshaded on the map.)
3/13/15 (Utah primary bill dies at end of the 2015 legislative session, eliminating February primary option for 2016. Both parties will hold caucuses because the June primary option is too late to comply with national party delegate selection rules.)
3/11/15 (Massachusetts bill to consolidate primaries in June added to the calendar and reshaded on the map. Minnesota House bill to establish a presidential primary added to the calendar.)
3/10/15 (Arkansas bill to move consolidated primary from May to March added to the calendar.)
3/9/15 (Wisconsin bill moving the primary to February added to the calendar and reshaded on map. Kansas House bill to cancel 2016 presidential primary added to the calendar.)
3/8/15 (New Mexico March primary bill died in committee and reshaded on map. Utah Republican caucuses added to Caucuses States with no specified date list and reshaded on the map.)
3/4/15 (Washington bill to cancel the 2016 presidential primary added to the calendar.)
3/3/15 (Illinois legislation to move primary to July added to the calendar.)
3/2/15 (Florida House legislation to more officially schedule the presidential primary for the third Tuesday in March added to the calendar.)
2/27/15 (Minnesota legislation creating a last Tuesday in March primary added to the calendar.)
2/27/15 (Florida legislation to more officially schedule the presidential primary for March 15 added to the calendar. Given the Republican Party of Florida signal that it intends to keep a winner-take-all allocation and how the current law is worded, FHQ has made the decision to shift Florida to March 15 on the calendar (even with out passage of this legislation).)
2/24/15 (Vermont legislation to move presidential primary to same date as New Hampshire added to the calendar)
2/23/15 (Montana legislation pushing primary back to August added to the calendar.)
2/21/15 (Washington state House legislation to move the presidential primary to March 8 added to the calendar)
2/20/15 (Michigan moved to March 8 on the calendar and reshaded on the map after the primary bill was signed into law. Maryland legislation to move the primary back a week added to the calendar.)
2/18/15 (Kansas bill to cancel 2016 presidential primary added to the calendar)
2/17/15 (Arkansas bill to move primary from May to March to join the SEC primary added to the calendar, reshaded on the map)
2/16/15 (Washington state bill to move the presidential primary from May to March added to the calendar and reshaded on the map. Second Idaho March primary bill added to the calendar.)
2/15/15 (Minnesota caucuses date set and changed on the calendar. )
2/13/15 (Utah bill to move Western States Presidential Primary from the first Tuesday in February to the fourth Tuesday in March added to the calendar.)
2/11/15 (Vermont bill to move presidential primary to same date as New Hampshire added to calendar and reshaded on the map)
2/10/15 (Texas bill moving all primaries from the first Tuesday in March to the fourth Tuesday in January added to the calendar and reshaded on the map.)
2/8/15 (New Mexico bill to shift all primaries from the first Tuesday after the first Monday in June to the third Tuesday in March -- a potential Western regional primary date -- added to the calendar and reshaded on the map.)
2/6/15 (Legislation reestablishing an Idaho presidential primary and scheduling it for the second Tuesday in March added to the calendar and map.)
1/28/15 (Legislation moving the Michigan primary from February to March added to calendar and map.)
1/27/15 (Illinois bill moving the primary from the third Tuesday in March to the fourth Tuesday in June added to the calendar, reshaded on the map.)
1/23/15 (Connecticut bills for first Thursday in March Republican primary and March 1 primary added to calendar, reshaded on the map.)
1/22/15 (Mississippi legislation moving the presidential primary up one week to March added to the calendar)
1/20/15 (Arizona legislation anchoring presidential primary to Iowa added to the calendar and state reshaded on the map. Also proposed 2013 legislation from Illinois -- moving presidential primary to June -- added to calendar. Bill died in committee at the end of the 2014 state legislative session.)
1/8/15 (Changes made to the calendar and map to account for the end of 2014 legislative sessions. Michigan and Massachusetts primary bills expired at the adjournment of legislative sessions.)
12/13/14 (Legislation moving the Michigan primary from February to March added to calendar and map.)
9/12/14 (New York shifted up on the calendar to reflect sunset provision in 2011 law that expired at the end of 2012. The entire 2011 bill -- including setting the presidential primary date for April 24, 2012 -- was repealed at that time.)
8/26/14 (Arizona moved on the calendar after amended House bill was signed, shifting the primary from the fourth Tuesday in February to the Tuesday after March 15 in a presidential election year. The change officially occurred on April 16, 2014 when Governor Brewer signed the legislation into law.)
6/19/14 (Louisiana moved on the calendar after House bill moving primary from third Saturday after the first Tuesday in March to the first Saturday in March signed into law.)
6/4/14 (Missouri moved on the calendar and reshaded on the map after Senate bill signed into law. Law now calls for primary to be held on second Tuesday after the first Monday in March.)
5/31/14 (Louisiana legislation added to the calendar. Bill would move primary to first Saturday of March.)
3/28/14 (Missouri reshaded on the map to reflect both Senate and House primary bills calling for move to March)
3/14/14 (Utah reshaded on the map to reflect first in the nation presidential primary bill dying in committee)
3/9/14 (Missouri [April presidential primary bill]; Utah [first in the nation presidential primary] bills added to calendar)
8/13/13 (North Carolina presidential primary law anchoring contest to South Carolina presidential primary date added to the calendar, reshaded on the map)
6/13/13 (DC June presidential primary bill added to calendar, reshaded on the map; Missouri reshaded on the map to reflect presidential primary bills dying at the conclusion of the legislative session, Nevada reshaded on the map to reflect January primary bill dying in committee)
3/13/13 (Montana May consolidated primary bill added to the calendar, reshaded on the map)
3/5/13 (Florida March presidential primary bill added to the calendar, reshaded on the map)
3/4/13 (Nevada January presidential primary bill added, reshaded on the map)
2/28/13 (Massachusetts June presidential primary bill added, reshaded on the map)
1/6/12 (2016 presidential primary calendar first posted)

Sunday, August 02, 2015

Sunday Night Music Club v.40

Amanda Fucking Palmer.

Yes, she's often referred to herself that way.

"Runs In The Family" is a track off her 2008 album, "Who Killed Amanda Palmer?", a play on the mystery of the classic TV show "Twin Peaks", where a major plot point was a murder of character Laura Palmer. Also featured on the album is the always awesome Ben Folds.

Runs In The Family addresses the struggle of people with genetic illnesses, whether physical or mental. Although, based on Palmer's frenetic performance, I'd guess she was focusing more on mental illness.



Amanda Palmer also happens to be married to famed author Neil Gaiman (...and when are they going to finally make a movie out of "American Gods?"). And she wrote a book called "The Art of Asking", which I recently read and highly recommend, and that led me to watch her memorable TED talk that spawned the book. Very much worth a viewing.


Sunday, July 26, 2015

Jefferson, Jackson...Washington?

The Connecticut Democratic Party recently decided to drop two of the names on it's biggest annual fundraising event, the Jefferson Jackson Bailey Dinner, or the "JJB" in common parlance.

Thomas Jefferson was a slave owner, and he also (let's face it) repeatedly raped at least one of his slaves (because consent cannot be given when someone is incarcerated or directly under complete control of another).

Andrew Jackson worked against the abolitionists and sided with the South on the issue of slavery, along with being responsible for the slaughter of countless Native Americans.

So that leaves state political operative John Moran Bailey as the only remaining name currently attached to Connecticut's Democratic dinner. I don't know if he did anything wrong, but I'd be willing to bet he doesn't approach the other two in notoriety.

I don't have much of an opinion either way about the name change. I guess I'm in favor of acknowledging the wrongful acts they committed, and if part of that acknowledgment means their names being dropped from the dinner, I'm fine with it.

But in all the articles I've read about this topic, there's one name that hasn't really come up. This person of course isn't named in the JJB, but he has always been honored and revered in this country since it was founded.

I'm talking about George Washington.

The Father of our Country.

The First President.

And, a person who owned slaves. At times, well over 100 slaves.

If we are seriously discussing scrubbing Jefferson and Jackson's name off of high-profile political events, shouldn't we also take a closer look at George's dealings in the slave trade?

There are apologists for Washington and Jefferson, who say that they were simply citizens of their time, and they were born into a society where is was considered acceptable for a wealthy landowner to own slaves.

True, Washington was the only founding father who freed his slaves upon his death, he attempted to keep slave families together, and he agonized over the issue of slavery.

While still owning and working his slaves.

Sounds like a bit of a disconnect there, right?

Then again, when one of the slaves, Oney Judge, a personal attendant to Martha, escaped to the north, ol' George didn't hesitate to send agents to attempt to capture her and return her to slavery. By the way, there's an episode of Drunk History where comic Jen Kirkman hilariously narrates the Oney Judge story after drinking too much wine.



The point I'm making is, why hasn't anyone brought up the discussion that George Washington was just as guilty of the crime of slavery as Jefferson?

The answer, I think, is because Washington enjoys a status far above any other other person in American history. He is simultaneously a great leader, a hallowed saint, and a true visionary. He essentially IS the American ideal. But he also owned slaves. It would be very uncomfortable for everyone to start a conversation along those lines.

It is inevitable that this will become a topic that will have to be addressed.

How the discussion goes will say a lot about America and it's people.

Sunday, July 12, 2015

What a bunch of dopes

I really wanted to title this post "What A Bunch Of Colossal Assholes", but I figured the NSFW headline might appear on people's news feeds, and I didn't want anyone to have an issue at work.

Confederate Flag Amendment

House Republican leadership pulled the fiscal year 2016 Department of Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations bill from the floor after several members voiced opposition to an amendment that would have allowed Confederate flag paraphernalia to be sold at national parks and displayed on graves at National Park Service-run cemeteries.

Once again, the Republicans are stopping progress on a necessary bill for bullshit politicking and lame posturing.

I can only hope that voters in the 2016 election will take the power out of these destructive idiot's hands and allow the adults to run the country for a while.

Saturday, July 11, 2015

Former Speaker Amann steps down from Milford DTC

Former House Speaker James Amann has recently announced his resignation from the Milford Democratic Town Committee. He was on the DTC for 33 years, and even though he reportedly hasn't attended any meetings since his abortive 2010 run for Governor, he feels that he needs to step down and allow others to lead.

Yes, I'm fully aware of the irony in that last sentence.

Amann currently heads Milford-based International Government Strategies, a lobbying firm described in media as "a governmental affairs consulting firm".

Which is long for "lobbying firm".


I'm speculating that he stepped down because his firm likely "consults" with members of various political parties, and he probably doesn't want to look biased by being a current member of the DTC.

Which is fine with me, more power to him. He's certainly entitled to all the success he can get.

Full disclosure (although why I think it's necessary, I don't know): I've been a mostly non-involved member of the Milford DTC for several years, although I still do proudly display lawn signs for our party's candidates every fall.

Saturday, June 27, 2015

The Supreme Court actually had a good week

Yeah, I know. I'm surprised too.

First, the Court upheld the Affordable Care Act yet again (commonly known as "Obamacare"). Justice Roberts states:


Then there's the gay marriage decision:

“It would misunderstand these men and women to say they disrespect the idea of marriage. Their plea is that they do respect it, respect it so deeply that they seek to find its fulfillment for themselves. Their hope is not to be condemned to live in loneliness, excluded from one of civilization’s oldest institutions. They ask for equal dignity in the eyes of the law. The Constitution grants them that right.” –Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, writing for the majority

So yeah, I'd say that was a pretty good week there.

Sunday, June 21, 2015

They say all publicity is good publicity

But in this case, I'm sure Gold's Gym would prefer to stay out of the limelight.

Hey look, there's the South Carolina we-love-slavery flag! Woohoo!

Thursday, June 18, 2015

It's been over 150 years

How's about letting go of that fucking offensive flag, you ignorant racist shitdip inbred peckerwood rednecks?

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Donald Trump throws his hair into the ring

Yes, today was the announcement that we've all been waiting for! It looks like we'll have the Donald to kick around for at least 6 or 8 months!

Thank you Mr. Trump, for making my blog easy to write.